Category Archives: Curiosities

Time for Relaxation.

As well as taking some time to relax after the intensive traveling I have also been attempting to sort out photos of temples and their significants, or special place, in our ancestry. I’ve made some progress and hopefully there will be a lot more pictures published before we leave for China on May 6th. I can hardly say ‘leave for China’ without a slight sense of disbelief creeping into my mind.
There has been lots of activity which I’d love to write about, notably a wonderful visit in Tokyo last evening, however now it’s 1.05 am and I’d better go to bed.

I have published the photo below for no good reason except that I like it. The concept of people bringing their own seating arrangements to wait for a bus and then leaving for others is an interesting one.


Iain and three chairs waiting at the bus stop near the hostel in Kyoto.

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Please do not Smoke


One of a series of posters found on Japanese trains and stations. Neat!

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Yes, mopping the platform!

Seen at Nagoya station while waiting for the shinkansen (“bullet train”) this afternoon.

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Attention to Detail.

While transferring trains this morning I had a cup of tea ‘to go’ on a station platform. The tea bag label was stuck down with scotch tape to the side of the cup so it wouldn’t fall into the liquid, the way it invariably does. And, if that wasn’t enough, there was a small sticker over the hole one drinks from so that the heat wouldn’t escape. In Japanese the label carried a reminder that the liquid inside was very hot. It was!

For a Briton this is all good news.

Created on Chino Railway Station in a public access Internet room. That’s approx. 50p an hour or 80c USD

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‘About’ circa 2003

I retrieved the following from the Internet Archive Wayback Machine and republish here as a record of where and when Jade Mountain(s) Buddha Hall came into existence. Bit of history; much has changed since I wrote this.
Mugo Dec 2, 2012

Rev. Mugo’s Biographical Details.

Rev. Mugo White is a disciple of the late Rev. Master Jiyu-Kennett, having been ordained by her at Shasta Abbey in 1981. Rev. Mugo became a Teacher of Buddhism in 1989 and, in 2000, was named a Master in The Order of Buddhist Contemplatives.

Since 1996 she has served as the international OBC Lay Ministry Advisor.

The Last Ten Years.

During the past ten years or so, due to circumstances that unfolded within the Order, I have been traveling a great deal. While priests of the Order do travel they are usually based in one place, the majority live in a monastery. I make this point lest a reader mistakenly think that what I describe below is the norm. Physical stability, especially in the early years of training, is considered to be important in growing spiritual stability.

In late 1993 I left Reading Buddhist Priory in England, where I had served as prior for about three years, and went to Shasta Abbey to assisted my master until her death in 1996. From then I was based either at Shasta Abbey or at Throssel Hole Buddhist Abbey. In early 2000 I moved to Cornwall, England while caring out my monastic responsibilities as a priest of the Order in Europe and North America. At that time a 25 ft. trailer, on property belonging to lay sangha members near Helston, served as my ‘monastery’. I understand, in the time of the Buddha, even a grass-thatched hut would be regarded as a monastery. This being so, and it being our custom to give one’s residence a name, I called the trailer Jade Mountain Buddha Hall. The trailer and its surroundings provided a safe haven to which I have returned for months at a time.

How the Site Got its Name.

The name Jade Mountain Buddha Hall came to me one day in late 2000. In Zen, we have the term ‘mountain still sitting’ and Jade Mountain seemed an appropriate name for my trailer. Over time, and due in large part to my being on the move, the name ‘Jade Mountain’ has become less linked to a physical location in Cornwall and more to me as a priest. This being so, and there being a need for sangha members to find me somewhere, I set up this site.

The Purpose of the Site.

I am committed to the Serene Reflection Meditation Tradition (Soto Zen) and to passing that tradition on to others. This site is one way of doing that. There are articles offering spiritual encouragement, personal insights into training in daily life as well as ones explaining the forms and practices of this tradition (as they have been passed on to me). Jade Mountain is my ‘personal web site’. The views expressed are mine and do not necessarily represent those of the Order as a whole.

Dedication of Merit.

May the merit accrue through creating and writing for this site be offered in eternal gratitude to my parents, Dorothy and Tony White, and to all beings.

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