Category Archives: Uncategorized

Goodnight Lakeland Fells

The Deer in the park
Sheep and lambs
All growing
Along with the trees.

Nothing lacking.

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Why am I Doing This?

Within this article, which goes to the extremes of human behaviour to be sure, are questions for all who endeavour to live a conscious life.

2189 Mile Marathon’. The question ‘Why am I doing this’ is a good one. Introspection is good, unless you are an ultr-marathoner…..https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/06/the-2189-mile-marathon/559112/

How do you get the unrelenting sense of purpose that sustains, say, one of the world’s greatest ultra-marathoners? Not the way you might think: Avoiding introspection seems to be key. Hutchinson, a creditable runner himself (though his career never came close to matching Jurek’s), spends long passages puzzling over the mysteries of his own peak performances and dissecting his failures. Jurek, meanwhile, gives the impression that doubting his commitment hardly ever even occurred to him—until he hit the Appalachian Trail.

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Mother’s Day – USA

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Buddhism From Within

Tom (Thomas) Wharton, a Canadian author, wrote the following back in 2005 when I was running a priory in Edmonton. At that time I was keen to see Rev Master Daizui”s book more widely read or even known about. The following review copied below was never used, up until now. Here it is. Thanks Tom for letting me put this onto Jade after all this time.

I like Rev. MacPhillamy’s relaxed, conversational style. The lack of terms from other languages is also refreshing and offers a less "exotic" approach to the subject, which is a good thing. The ancient, Asian terminology that most Buddhist books use can make it seem that you should be having an ancient, Asian experience to really practice meditation, whatever that might mean!

The section on karma and rebirth I found particularly fascinating and helpful. I’ve never seen these elusive concepts set down in quite this accessible way. Rev. MacPhillamy proceeds from a straightforward description of ethical cause and effect which one can quickly verify for oneself with a little thought (when we hurt others we hurt ourselves), and proceeds from there to the more "cosmic" way of looking at the consequences of our actions.

At the stage I’m at with all of this, I find I’m not ready or willing to invest belief in some of these more cosmic notions. But of course neither Rev. MacPhillamy nor Buddhism itself would insist that I do so. And I feel that this respect for the individual person’s freedom of belief is one of the best clues that Buddhism points a trustworthy way to the truth about the universe. Truth shouldn’t need to be policed.

The last chapter, "So, Is this a religion?" offers a brief telling of Shakyamuni Buddha’s life which thankfully doesn’t scatter lotus petals over everything. This is the kind of biography that I would show to people who wanted to find out about the historical Buddha. It’s hard for us cynical westerners to believe that he is not actually worshipped by Buddhists when one reads some of the more mythic versions of his life story. Maybe these magical stories are true. How should I know? I just find it’s more encouraging to me to think about Buddha the human being.
Review written by Thomas Wharton

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