The Door Is Open

spring_looking_in_all_directions_dafodils1.jpg
Spring looking in all directions

Nothing like spring flowers to bring a smile to the heart. And the smell in the air too. Country smells. And sounds too. Drying mud. Animal manure. Lambs calling. Birds squawking. But it all falls to the ground with a splash as the rain and wind returns, which it has in the last couple of days.

And as many of you know Jade fell to the ground for a couple of days too. I think it was a combination of web server trouble, and possible something I just might have done…possibly. Anyway, thanks to those of you who wrote letting me know the site was not it’s usual self. And many thanks for the tech help in Houston which has everything working just as it should.

Having the site down had me wondering just why I was so out of sorts even though I knew (had faith perhaps) that eventually all would be back to normal. And it struck me the downed site was the equivalent of not being able to unlock the front door of a Priory. Nobody could get in.

There is a ceremony we have where a priest essentially makes a promise to keep the door of the temple open so people can benefit from what’s offered inside. On a personal level I guess there is the wish or promise one makes to oneself to always keep open to what is offered.

Thanks for returning and walking through the door.

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4 thoughts on “The Door Is Open”

  1. Good to have you back online – it had all the hall marks of something that was supposed to be easy, not being easy. Computers/internet are so wonderful, but sometimes they’ve just had enough – and let us know it :)

    Sometimes, for me, the closed door can be a useful metaphor. I’d decided I was going to have an HIV test many moons ago, and went to see the Tibetan Buddha statues in the British Museum. The display was in the process of being refurbished so I could only see their backs, at first I felt cross and let down. Then I realised that it was because this bit I needed to do on my own steam so to speak – the Buddha within I guess. Although that’s duality but I think you’ll understand what I mean. So closed doors are sometimes helpful.

    I’ve been meaning to email you anyway – Deborah has just received a diagnosis from a paediatrician as being somewhere on the autistic spectrum, and I wanted to let you know. Michael is definitely not, but both full of life, and in the main, happy. Michael’s naming ceremony is soon too.

    Writing the above bit about closed doors has been a useful experience, yesterday I had a truly terrible day with the children. Whenever they screamed, I did and it carried on for most of the morning, with few breaks. Luckily lunch resolved things happily, and the afternoon was peaceful. Part of it is my feeling of being unsupported and shocked and dismayed after Deborah’s diagnosis (my Mother in Law and Ian, and others do support me). Another part is that we’re all ill, and I think I have a chest infection too. But its the same experience as seeing the Buddha’s from the back again – maybe as well as being propelled to find my own strength there is something about the backbone of the Buddha that’s in there for me too? So closed doors or backbones, I guess it’s how they are for you too that’s useful.

  2. Dear Rev. Mugo

    I wondered what had happened. Whether it was my own PC getting up to some electronic trickery, – it is getting a bit slow these days, or something major had happened to the site.

    Nice to see Jade Mountain is back. I was missing my daily dose. I don’t comment often but visit (almost) daily.

    __/\__

    Norman

  3. This is our first spring in our cottage in the Pennine foothills and it is a wonder to both of us to see what flowers are now warm enough to peep out from between the rocks and out of the soil (and it’s lovely to see the cows return to our back fence!). No piece of flora is stranger or more of a surprise than the Snakes Head Fritillary, a plant we couldn’t even identify last week. Its delicate and fragile purple-and-white lanterns are coping with the April blasts of our uncertain Spring – a true wonder and beauty, and perhaps a little lesson to us all about what we can withstand whilst still giving a few dollops of joy out to those around us.

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