Category Archives: Out and About

Love our UK Footpaths

I love our system of footpaths, spidering across the UK Ordnance Survey maps. I’ve followed many on foot and by pony; uphill, down dale, fells, mountains, marshes, coastal paths, long-distance paths, bridle paths. Walking can be moving meditation, mood-elevating, exciting (memorable moment on Great Gable back in 2016), frightening (also Great Gable 2016!) I could go on and on about entering the great outdoors and staying out for long hours, rain, shine, bitterly cold. Sometimes all at the same time! I’ll not go on though. A short video filmed in a church yard in Wasdale Head after that 2016 walk.

If you are a one who follows paths, don’t want our valuable historic paths to disappear then nip over to the Ramblers website and take a look at your area on the map. It’s easy.

Walkers are being urged to help identify 10,000 miles of historic footpaths that are missing from the map in England and Wales and could be lost forever.

All rights of way must be identified before a government deadline of 2026, after which it will no longer be possible to add old paths to the official record.

The walking group Ramblers is calling on walkers, historians and map enthusiasts to use its new mapping site to identify missing footpaths.

The online tool divides the official map into 150,000 1km squares so users can compare historic and current maps side by side, spot any differences and submit missing paths.

The Guardian, Walkers urged to help save historic footpaths before 2026 deadline

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Nature – California Coast

Well, it took a bit to sit through this short video considering the kind of weather we are having in Britain right now. Watching the waves crash against rocks or seafronts or rivers against bridges sets me a bit on edge given the kind of damage water can do when at it’s most ferocious. As it is today and into the night I suspect. Anyway enjoy the energy of the waves and know it’s in another country entirely.

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Nature: Songbirds in Texas (Video)


A few moments to listen and watch, peacefully.

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Nature – Kangaroos – Video

Let the sights and sounds in this video fill our hearts and may we offer spiritual merit to all those involved in the forest fires currently raging in Austraila.

“Sunday Morning” takes us to the beach in Australia, among kangaroos fleeing forest fires that have been ravaging the country. Videographer: Harry Clapson.

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Training hand, heart and mind

This letter, first published in 2006, is reproduced now in slightly edited form.

Dear Rev. Mugo,
I thought I would write to let you know what I have discovered about Trinity College of Music at the time Rev. Master (Jiyu-Kennett) would have been in contact with it, in case it is of interest.

Trinity was started in 1872 by Bonavia Hunt who was deeply concerned by the quality of church music which was becoming poorer and poorer. Trinity was first known as the Church Choral Society and College of Church music. It was open to members of the Anglican Church, and men only! The college started with a view to teaching so that quality could be restored and the long tradition of church music continued. As it developed, the college trained teachers and offered exams throughout the world so that standards could be maintained. I’m not sure of the date, but women were also welcomed in to study before the war.

By 1939 the numbers at the college grew and the college ethos was one of welcome and the doors were opened on Sundays as well as all other days, “to keep the lamp of music burning during these dark days.” The choir was open to those who’s choral societies had had to disband for war reasons. Trinity hosted concerts throughout the war and two concerts in 1942 were given by the children of London county council and Middlesex who studied on Saturday mornings with Gladys Puttick, a pioneer who arrived at Trinity in 1934 and was one of the first to teach musicianship beyond the instrument. She was also the founder of the Saturday School and Trinity was the first music college to have a Saturday junior department. Distance Learning also started to help those unable to get into college to study, in fact Prisoners of War were able to do distance learning with help from the British Red Cross offices.

Gladys Puttick arrived in 1934 and stayed until the 1970s. Three other notable people were at Trinity from the 1930s – mid 1960s. Charles Kennedy Scott was keen on the study of Plainsong and the chanting of Psalms and gave regular lectures and led rehearsals. Dr Lowery was passionate about organs, organ music and is noted as giving superb lectures. The Principal of Trinity from 1944 -1965, Dr Wilfred Greehouse Allt was also an organist who was the President of the Incorporated Association of Organists from 1956-1958 and then of the Royal College of Organists from 1962-1964. Rev Master would almost certainly have come into contact with Gladys Puttick and Charles Kennedy Scott, whether based at Trinity or as a distant learner.

Gladys Puttick gave a lecture in the 1940s and it reveals an approach to learning that often goes unnoticed. She said that music was, “essentially a pivotal subject of education, since it could be the means of training, at once, the hand, the heart and the mind.”

It would appear that Rev Master was in good hands.

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